How To Set Up a New Skateboard

If you are struggling to get those bearings out of your old wheels, or just plain don’t want to mess anything up setting up a new deck, you found the right video. Check out this tutorial for everything you need to know to take apart an old skateboard and put together a shiny new one, plus a bunch of tricks to make it all easier. Enjoy.

Music for Shredding // Pt. 3

For part 1, click here.

For part 2, click here.

If you haven’t already looked at parts 1 and 2, you should do that. I wasn’t planning on doing another music post but lately I’ve discovered too much good music to keep it to myself. The songs in this post are all over the map but the one thing they have in common is that in my opinion, they’re all really good tunes. They’re also all electronic, but I’ve really been digging that lately.

Lemaitre is a producer from Norway. He has a bunch of great songs out there, and Continuum is probably his most popular. That doesn’t mean it isn’t sick though. If you like it also check out the song Keep Close.

Madeon is another sick producer, based in France. Stay Awake is an awesome track that really gets me pumped and focused. This isn’t your average, repetitive dub step track. It’s actual music. Ellie Goulding does the vocals on this track as well which makes it even better. Check out Technicolor and You’re On for more tracks from Madeon with a similar vibe.

Synchronice is yet another incredible producer. He’s based in New Jersey. Maybe I’m biased since he’s a good friend, but every new track he comes out with blows me away. His remix of Taking Over by Favright is no exception….damn it makes me want to dance. Synchronice also did a sick remix of Dazzle Me by Oh Wonder which you should definitely check out. The piano melodies in this track get stuck in my head all day. If you want to check out one of his original songs listen to The Only.

And finally, here’s a track from Washed Out. This guy is a sick chill wave artist and all his songs have that super relaxed vibe. I think Feel It All Around is actually the theme song for Portlandia, if you’ve seen it. If you dig this song check out Eyes Be Closed for a similar groove.

There you have it! If you have any suggestions or comments, leave one below and let me know.

Herb Neumann: Low-Key Legend

Herb Neumann might not be a guy that most skaters know, but anyone who knew the man knows how important he was to skateboarding. Herb was more than just a low-key local legend in North Jersey, he was a great skater, innovative creator, and most of all a friend and mentor to myself and others. Herb passed in November 2014 after fighting cancer for many years. The news was tough. Without Herb, skating would be different and so would be my life, and the lives of my friends. He gave us all a lot and for me, that keeps his memory alive in my head every day.

I bought my first skateboard from Herb. I bought my first longboard from Herb. For years I went to his shop, called Skatewerks, and bought stuff from him. Over time, we became friends just through talking at the shop. My friends also got to know him better and soon we would all go there together, buy some wheels or something, and just talk about boards. One day Herb let us join him for a little skate session. The hill was small and only a few blocks from the shop, so like he would do, Herb simply closed the store and went skating. We followed him down the hill. At the bottom you have to turn 90 degrees either left or right, and we decided on left. All of a sudden there was a pickup truck in front of us. My friend and I both tried to slide but didn’t have the skill at the time. His board got totally run over and mine ended up stuck under the truck’s rear tire. Herb meanwhile had gone through the corner with no issues and skated back over to us worried that our parents would never let us near him again. I will always remember this day because it scared the shit out of me, and it made me realize how bad I was (and how good Herb was) at skating.

A while later (when we had more skill) Herb showed my friends and I a massive, smooth, consistently car-less hill close to our hometown. Since then we have skated this hill almost as our go-to, and have even held slide jams there. This hill is a dead end from the top, so at the bottom is the critical 90 degree turn onto the cross street. I will never forget driving Herb’s car down the hill behind him as he bombed it carving deep, then stuck the chicane and smoothly made the critical right turn at the bottom. His style is something I’ll never forget. He inspired me to try his line a few weeks later – full bore bomb, through the corners, then to the right at the bottom. I slammed on my head hard trying the final turn, to the point where my full-face chipped and cracked a little. I have never tried it again, but something tells me I need to now. This memory of Herb is just another reminder to me of what a great skater he was, and how much he loved to do it.

herb board

This photo is of a commemorative board that Stimulus made in Herb’s memory. Only 50 were made I think, but I’m still gonna ride mine. The board’s graphic is one of the steezy-est photos I have seen. Herb could shred like nobody else. This board is just another thing to remind me of Herb and what he gave to me. Lately I’ve felt more inspired. I’ve had more of a desire to skate, surf, snowboard, and to push my limits in general, and I know that comes from Herb’s memory. He was always pushing himself and skating no matter what, and that will stick with me forever.

Skateboard, Don’t Commute

As someone who lives in a really crowded area in the most crowded state in the USA, I hit traffic constantly while driving. Never is this worse than at rush hours. I hate it. People in my area cannot drive well at all. As the roads get crowded, these people totally fall apart. That’s why I skate to class and work whenever it’s nice enough outside.

Beating traffic and avoiding idiotic drivers isn’t the only reason to skate to work or school. Skateboards are pretty small and light. They also don’t need any special parking or storage. All you need to do is throw it under a desk, in a locker, or in a corner somewhere. Skateboards can be carried anywhere too. If you need to take a train or bus, you can easily take a board with you. In that way, skateboards can go places bikes can’t. Just ask the skateboarding professor. This guy is a 69 year old professor at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, and he’s been skateboarding to work since 1993. Check him out in this video.

Taken from Jenken Mag.

Besides being practical and portable, skateboards are fun. Commuting isn’t fun, no matter what car you drive. On top of that, skateboarding is a sick workout, especially if you need to go up any hills. If you don’t like the sound of that, just think….you get to bomb those hills going home. As if you needed another reason to skateboard, it’s also cheaper than commuting. You don’t need gas, and you don’t need to pay to park. Give it a try on the next nice day.

Why You Need More Boards

This may seem a little contradictory since my last post was a rant about why you really don’t need high end gear. But, that’s because this post is for people who could actually benefit from some better gear.

Why do you think there are so many different skateboards, longboards, surfboards, and snowboards for sale? Sure, every company is trying to get a piece of the cash flow, but in doing that some actually come up with unique ideas for shredding in specific conditions. Basically, that’s why you need more boards.

Surfing is a great example. There are boards for all wave conditions with all types of dimensions, rail profiles, and tail shapes. Each of these will dramatically affect the way a board performs, given that you have the ability to notice subtle differences in ride. Short, fat, thick boards are ideal for small waves. Longer, thinner, skinnier boards (called a step-up or “gun”) are better in larger waves. Some step-ups also have channeled bottoms, which give you more speed and drive in big, perfect surf. You’d get pretty frustrated trying to ride a step-up board in 2 foot shorebreak though. That’s a basic explanation, but you should get the idea.

Snowboarding is pretty much the same. To tear up a park, I prefer a really flexy, shorter board. These boards will be symmetrical for easy switch riding and are generally lighter than stiff boards, which makes them easier to press and spin. Powder boards are usually directional, meaning each has a dedicated nose and tail and is intended to be ridden in one direction. These boards are generally longer and stiffer, and many incorporate some type of unique swallow tail design for a really surfy feel in deep pow. Regardless of all of this, every snowboard also has a distinct camber profile. Cambered, rockered, and flat boards are the most common, but many companies combine these to create hybrids. That’s an explanation for another post though.

To sum it all up, more boards equals more fun. Riding the wrong board for the conditions is a pain in the ass, no matter your skill. As you improve, experiment with different boards from what you’re used to. You’ll probably find a new favorite setup.

Why Your Gear Doesn’t Matter

This is something that has continually pissed me off for a long time. Especially in snowboarding (because lots of fools do that one) I feel like it’s impossible to go ride without seeing someone who can barely stand, let alone ride, with a setup worth upwards of $700. That is the perfect illustration of why gear doesn’t matter, and I could stop there. But I won’t.

Gear does not make you better whatsoever. The reality is, if you don’t know anything about something like surfing and you buy a fancy step-up board with crazy design features, you are cheating yourself. Same goes for snowboarding. If you buy a stiff ripper of a board with some crazy camber/rocker combo and you’re a beginner, you might as well ride a plank. You won’t be able to tell the difference. Not only are you wasting money on stuff that you don’t need at a low ability level that won’t help you, you might actually be making it worse for yourself. Surfing is a good example because a thin, skinny step-up will be tougher to ride than a longboard in pretty much any scenario.

Gear can’t help you until you have the skill to notice the differences between the top-end shit and the basic shit. Personally, in longboarding I find that wheels and bushings have the biggest effect on how a board feels. Fact is though, I couldn’t notice differences in how wheels slide until recently. It takes time to get comfortable enough in a boardsport that you begin to notice the intricacies of your equipment. Then, when you change your equipment up, the differences are obvious.

Bottom line? It takes a bit of skill to even notice the fancy features of a board, or fins, or wheels, or bushings, or whatever. Once you have that skill, feel free to go crazy customizing your setups. But until then, do yourself a favor and buy something basic.